Biophysical Society Bulletin | December 2021

December 2021

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Future of Biophysics BurroughsWellcome Fund SymposiumSpeakers

Antoine Coulon

Alex Holehouse

Afua Nyarko

Liman Zhang

The 2022 Future of Biophysics Burroughs Wellcome Fund Speakers will highlight the work of young researchers who are currently conducting cutting-edge research at the interface of the physical and life sciences. The speakers selected for 2022 are Antoine Coulon , Institut Curie, France; Alex Holehouse , Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, USA; Afua Nyarko , Oregon State University, USA; and Liman Zhang , Oregon Health and Science University, USA. The Symposium, in its 13th year, will be held Monday, February 21, 2022. Elizabeth Komives and Arthur Palmer , Program Co-Chairs for the 66th Annual Meeting, will co-chair the symposium. “The Future of Biophysics Burroughs Wellcome Fund Symposium is one of the highlights of the Annual Meeting. Four outstanding young biophysicists are selected each year from an exceptional list of nominations and invited to present their work at the Symposium. The goal of the Symposium is to showcase cutting-edge research pioneered by these leaders in areas that reflect the richness and diversity of biophysics. These young colleagues, and the many more equally deserving nominees who could not be selected, truly represent the promising future of Biophysics.”

— Elizabeth Komives and Arthur Palmer

Best of Biophysical Journal Symposium

Inside

2 4 6 8 9

President’s Message Biophysicist in Profile

Public Affairs Publications Member Corner

Sujit S. Datta

Jochen Guck

Susan B. Rempe

Anđela Šarić

10 11 12 14 16 18 20

Career Development

Grants and Opportunities

For the second year, Biophysical Journal will host a symposium to highlight the excel- lent science published in the journal. This year’s event will be titled Biophysical Journal : Molecules to Health. The speakers, including the Paper of the Year Award recipient, will be authors from the past year invited to present about their articles, representing a subset of the high quality research published. The Paper of the Year Award recogniz- es an early career researcher who has published an outstanding paper in the journal. The speakers will be Sujit S. Datta , Princeton University, USA; Jochen Guck , Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max-Planck-Zentrum für Physik und Medizin, and Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany; Susan B. Rempe , Sandia National Laboratories, USA; and Anđela Šarić (Paper of the Year), University College London, United Kingdom.

Annual Meeting

Cheers for Volunteers

Communities

Donations

Upcoming Events

President’s Message

Fall Council Accepts Task Force Reports on Ethics and Subgroups

announced the 2024 Annual Meeting co-chairs: Ibrahim Cissé and Elizabeth Villa . Day 2 of Fall Council kicked off with two weighty topics: BPS Ethics Guidelines and an Awards and Fellows Revocation Policy, which were presaged in the October Bulletin (https:/ www.biophysics.org/bps-bulletin/be-excellent-to-each- other). These policies are essential to BPS’s ability to create a safe, welcoming, and inclusive community as well as to confirm expectations that members adhere to high ethical standards. The revocation policy provides a mechanism to review and remove a bestowed honor if the recipient fails to adhere to the Ethics Guidelines. These items are published on the BPS website (https:/www.biophysics.org/About-BPS/ Governance). Recommendations from the Subgroup Task Force were discussed and accepted on Day 2 also. Recommendations include limiting the number of Subgroups to 18 (primarily due to space and time limitations at the Annual Meeting), formally evaluating the Subgroups on an annual basis, providing a best practices guide to Subgroup Chairs, establishing an incubator program to support emerging topics, and changing the application requirements for new Subgroup applications. More details and updates to the Subgroup website (https:/www.biophysics.org/subgroups) will be forthcoming. The Membership Committee sent a proposal to Council for regular incremental dues increases and a multi-year mem- bership option. The first item would help the Society manage increasing expenses as we continue to develop and improve programs for members. The second item provides a conve- nient way for members to renew for multiple years in one transaction while also providing a financial benefit of “locking in” the current year’s membership rate. Council unanimously approved both proposals. BPS Councilor and Nominating Committee Chair Henry Colecraft presented the slate containing two candidates for President, one candidate for Secretary, and eight candidates for Council for the 2022 election. We collectively approved the slate, which will be presented to members when the election opens on June 1, 2022. The third and final day of Fall Council focused on the finances of the Society. The majority of BPS revenues typically come from the Annual Meeting, Biophysical Journal , and member dues. However, with the cancellation of the Boston meeting earlier this year, expenses related to the virtual meeting, and

The Biophysical Society (BPS) Council met virtually, once again, for Fall Council. We spent the last three working days of October discussing the many issues at hand for BPS and our members.

Frances Separovic

Day 1 opened with an update on BPS diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) activities, including BPS’s ongoing participation in the Alliance to Catalyze Change for Equity in STEM Suc- cess (ACCESS) and their new ACCESS+ initiative, which helps participants prepare action plans to guide their DEI change work and creates a Community of Practice for the alliance participants. The Justice for Underrepresented Scholars Train- ing in Biophysics (JUST-B) Poster Session development was reviewed as well, and we are very excited about the inaugural event taking place at BPS 2022 in San Francisco. Council turned lively with the presentation of the Awards and Fellows nominee and winner data. While efforts from the Committee on Professional Opportunities for Women (CPOW) Awards Subcommittee have positively impacted the number of women nominated for BPS Awards and Fellows, the num- ber of international members being nominated is quite low and not reflective of the international composition of the Society. Council agreed that we need to do much more to ensure diversity in nominations and provided several sugges- tions that will be pursued as we move into the next awards cycle. The BPS Annual Meeting is always a central topic at Council meetings, and this session was no different. The abstract sort for the 2022 Annual Meeting took place the day prior to the start of our meeting, so program co-chairs Elizabeth Komives and Art Palmer were able to provide an update on the full pro- gram. There are 96 outstanding invited speakers, and many symposia originated from member submissions or incorpo- rated their suggestions. The meeting will also feature about 500 posters per day. An ePoster gallery will be available to attendees so they can view posters online in advance of the meeting. The ePoster gallery and recordings of the Subgroup Symposia, BPS Lecture, Award talks, and the Workshops will be available on-demand after the Annual Meeting for those unable to attend in person. Program co-chairs for the 2023 Annual Meeting, Baron Chan- da and Janice Robertson , provided us with an early overview of the next meeting, and President-Elect-Elect Taekjip Ha

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President’s Message

Officers President Frances Separovic President-Elect Gail Robertson Past-President Catherine A. Royer Secretary Erin Sheets Treasurer Samantha Harris Council Henry Colecraft Michelle A. Digman Erin C. Dueber Marta Filizola Gilad Haran Kumiko Hayashi Francesca Marassi

Susan Marqusee Joseph A. Mindell Carolyn A. Moores Kandice Tanner Biophysical Journal Jane Dyson Editor-in-Chief The Biophysicist Sam Safran Editor-in-Chief Biophysical Reports

Members of Council and BPS staff meet remotely for Fall Council.

lower registration, the Annual Meeting lost money in 2021, underperforming prior years by more than $500,000. Relatedly, revenue from member dues was down by approximately $170,000 compared with last year. We antici- pated these shortfalls when we approved the 2021 budget last fall and made the conscious decision not to cut any programs or services. The projections we reviewed at Fall Council were better than we budgeted but still reflect the challenging year that was experienced world-wide. Treasurer Samantha Harris and Director of Finance Harris Povich presented the 2022 budget. We are again projecting a loss due to estimated numbers of meeting attendees and members (greater than in 2021 but fewer than in 2020) as well as increased expenses for the in-person and on-demand versions of the Annual Meeting. However, we will work to minimize the deficit and continue to invest in programs and resources to support our

members, knowing that the future of BPS depends on a strong, successful membership. One of the last items of business at Fall Council was looking ahead, past Joint and New Coun- cil at the Annual Meeting, to Spring Council. We’ll convene in person in early June 2022 with the aim of creating a new strategic plan to help guide our organization for the next several years, envisioning diversity, equity, and inclusion as the foundation of all our goals and taking lessons learned these past two years to remain nimble and member focused. As always, we want to hear from you! If you have any questions about anything in this summary or other activities of the Society, or would like to share your thoughts, please reach out to us at fs@unimelb.edu.au and jpesanelli@biophysics.org. — Frances Separovic , President — Jennifer Pesanelli , Executive Officer

Jörg Enderlein Editor-in-Chief

Society Office Jennifer Pesanelli Executive Officer Newsletter Executive Editor Jennifer Pesanelli Managing Editor John Long

Production Catie Curry Ray Wolfe Proofreader/Copy Editor Laura Phelan The Biophysical Society Newsletter (ISSN 0006-3495) is published eleven times per year, January-December, by the Biophysical Society, 5515 Security Lane, Suite 1110, Rockville, Maryland 20852. Distributed to USA members and other countries at no cost. Cana- dian GST No. 898477062. Postmaster: Send address changes to Biophysical Society, 5515 Security Lane, Suite 1110, Rockville, MD 20852. Copyright © 2021 by the Biophysical Society.

Just-B Poster Session The inaugural JUST-B (Justice for Underrepresented Scholars Training in Biophysics) Poster Session will celebrate the achievements of underrepresented and underserved students, postdocs, and early career researchers in the field of biophysics. To present your poster during this event, you must submit an abstract by the January 6 late abstract deadline and submit an application. For specific application requirements, please visit biophysics.org/2022meeting.

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Biophysicist in Profile

Julie Biteen Area of Research: Single-molecule fluorescence imaging

Institution University of Michigan

At-a-Glance

Julie Biteen has always had a quantitative mind, but thought she would pursue a career in civil engineering until she fell in love with basic research during her undergraduate years thanks to the influence of great teachers. Now, years later, she is a professor of chemistry and of biophysics at the University of Michigan.

Julie Biteen

Julie Biteen grew up in Montreal, Canada, where her father worked in human resources and her mother was a librarian. “My father worked in compensation and benefits, so he was the quantitative person in my family,” she shares. “My mother was a librarian, so she taught me that it’s more important to understand the underlying questions than to memorize any specific details as you can always look those up.” From an early age, Biteen enjoyed math and was intrigued by the idea of using quantitative skills to solve real-world prob- lems. “Growing up, I wanted to work at the interface of civil engineering and urban planning. However, I really fell in love with basic science in college thanks to some great chemistry teachers. I cannot imagine doing anything other than chemis- try and optics—if I wasn’t a biophysical chemist, I would likely be doing work on nanochemistry,” she says. “I’ve also always been fascinated by optics questions like ‘why is the sky blue?’ and ‘why do fireflies light up in the dark?’ so I did optics re- search as an undergraduate and PhD student in chemistry.” She attended Princeton University for her undergraduate studies, earning her degree in chemistry, followed by a mas- ter’s of science in applied physics from the California Institute of Technology, where she then earned her PhD in chemistry. “I first started thinking about biophysics when I was looking for a postdoctoral research position. The way I had previ- ously learned biology felt very observational, but biophysics provided the opportunity to apply quantitative methods and physical principles to biological problems!” she remembers. “In particular, toward my interests, I was thrilled to have the chance to apply my expertise in fluorescence and quantitative image analysis to understand how bacteria cells are orga- nized.” Biteen undertook a postdoctoral position in the lab of W. E. Moerner in the Chemistry Department of Stanford University. “I made the transition from solid-state physics in my PhD to biophysics in my postdoc when I was given the opportunity to work on applied bacteriology projects with W. E. Moerner,” she

explains. “From my time with W. E. and the rest of the Mo- erner lab, I became an expert in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and bacterial cell imaging. Furthermore, I was fortunate to have great collaborators during my postdoc: we worked together with Lucy Shapiro in Developmental Biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. From meetings and conversations with Lucy and the rest of the Shapiro lab, I began to develop real insight into bacterial cell biology.” During her postdoc, she developed the first super-resolution (photoactivated localization microscopy) images of protein assemblies in living bacterial cells: “We imaged the structural protein MreB in living Caulobacter crescentus and found that this protein organizes in helices or rings at different times in the cell cycle.” Biteen is a professor of chemistry and of biophysics at the University of Michigan. Her lab works on directly observing the positioning, dynamics, and interactions of proteins in microbial cells and relating these biophysical observations to biochemical processes in the cell. “We attack this challenge by developing single-molecule microscopy methods; by designing data analysis algorithms for tracking, background subtraction, and classification; and by integrating genetic mu- tations into our studies to relate motion and function. My lab has recently developed a new algorithm, NOBIAS, that uses Bayesian analysis to separate single-molecule trajectories into different states of motion and then uses machine learn- ing to assess anomalous diffusion behavior for each state. We are applying algorithms like this one to understand different fundamental subcellular processes in living microbes—cur- rent projects range from understanding carbohydrate utili- zation by gut microbes in collaboration with Nicole Koropatkin at the University of Michigan Medical School; to measuring epigenetic regulation via histone modifications in fission yeast in collaboration with Kaushik Ragunathan , also at the Univer- sity of Michigan Medical School; to quantifying the chromo- some stress response in Escherichia coli in collaboration with Anne Meyer at University of Rochester,” she shares. “We are also developing methods to enhance fluorescence with metal

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Biophysicist in Profile

nanoparticles, to measure chirality, and to address single cells in real time with microfluidics. The common thread through all of these diverse projects is careful, quantitative microscopy and analysis.” As evidenced by this list of projects, Biteen is invigorated by collaboration. “I find collaborative projects extremely re- warding. Finding the overlap between my methods and the interests of biologist or biochemist colleagues leads to very exciting research,” she says. “It’s particularly inspiring for me to watch my students and postdocs learn all aspects of their projects—from the microscopy that my lab is very expert at to the details of a biological question that might be new to us. I like the reassurance that thinking across traditional disci- plinary lines can indeed lead to transformative change.” Because there have been so many opportunities, she goes on: “The biggest challenge in my career has been to decide how to prioritize my commitments and where to spend my time. Over the years, I’ve decided that science really has to be about the people, so I do my best to prioritize filling my lab with excellent, thoughtful scientists, creating a safe, positive, and inclusive community in my lab and developing strong ties with excellent collaborators.” Biteen is grateful for the biophysics community, especially as experienced at the BPS Annual Meeting. “I really appreciate the community that the Biophysical Society meetings provide. My favorite part of the Annual Meeting is always walking around the poster session—everyone comes out to support junior colleagues and to network, and some of the best sci- entific discourse happens in the aisles between the posters!” she declares.

She also loves Subgroup Saturday. “I’ve been involved as the chair of two different Subgroups: Nanoscale Biophysics in 2017 and Physical Biology of the Cell in 2020. This gave me the opportunity both times to invite a terrific lineup of speakers for a symposium, to have a part in shaping the field,” she explains. “In general, [the meeting’s] community feeling is very important to me: every year, the BPS meeting confirms for me the idea that people around the world care about the work we are doing in my lab, and I always return to Ann Arbor with increased motivation and enthusiasm for our research!” Her advice to early career biophysicists is to have fun. She says, “We all work so hard that it’s easy to forget why we are doing it and get lost in the details. It’s important to stay motivated and energized by connecting the day-to-day work of science with the big-picture scientific curiosity and excite- ment.” Outside of work, Biteen spends her time with family and friends. “My sons are avid athletes, so I have a second identity as a soccer mom,” she jokes. “I’ve also enjoyed coaching their elementary school Science Olympiad teams. I like to eat well, to exercise, and to travel.” Profiles in Biophysics No two biophysicists have the same story. Read about the many paths that led each of them to become a biophysicist. www.biophysics.org/profiles-in-biophysics

Give the Gift of Membership Looking for the perfect gift for a colleague or aspiring biophysicist?

Now is a great time to give the gift of BPS membership, as the recipient will gain immediate access to valuable member benefits and a network of dedicated scientists committed to promoting and advancing biophysics research. To give the gift of BPS membership, visit biophysics.org/giftmembership.

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Public Affairs

BPS Congressional FellowMax Olender Joins Senate Committee Staff The Biophysical Society (BPS) is excited to share the news about 2021–2022 Congressional Fellow Max Olender . Olender began his fellowship in August with an intensive orientation program and interviewing with U.S. Congressional offices interested in hosting a AAAS Science and Technology Fellow. Olender was extended and accepted an offer to serve on the Subcommittee on Children and Families of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP). He will serve under the lead- ership of Senator Robert Casey (D-PA) and work in conjunction with his personal office staff. Committee work is highly compet- itive, supporting all Democratic members on the issues of jurisdiction to the committee. Olender is the first BPS Congressional Fellow to serve his tenure on a committee.

Pandemic Preparedness Back-Burnered asWhite House Struggles with Agenda As Congress struggles to enact the White House’s domestic agenda, pandemic preparedness seems to have taken a back burner. Senate HELP Committee Chair Patty Murray (D-WA) and Ranking Member Richard Burr (R-NC) had hoped to have a draft of their legislative priorities by late summer this year, but aides say the effort might be delayed as long as until early 2022 and the House Energy & Commerce Committee has not publicly announced plans to work on pandemic preparedness legislation. Murray has commented that discussions with the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy on policy details are ongoing even if legislative progress has been slow. Public health stakeholders have called on lawmakers not to squander the bipartisan momentum and miss out on an op- portunity for long-term investment in public health. Senate Spending Bills Bolster Science The Senate has made public its vision for the 2022 appro- priations bills, and while science funding remains a priority for fiscal year 2022 (FY22) which began on October 1, it is currently being funded at FY21 levels under a continuing resolution (CR) slated to expire on December 10. As of the time of writing, it is expected that we will face at least one more CR as Congress works through the differences in the twelve separate spending bills. The National Institutes of Health (NIH), the nation’s largest research funder, would see a 12% budget increase in 2022, for a total of $48 billion. Nearly

half of the $5 billion increase, or $2.4 billion, would go to the Biden administration’s proposed Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H). Like the House bill, the Senate measure contains a 6% increase for NIH’s base budget. The National Science Foundation (NSF) would receive an increase of $1 billion, to $9.5 billion, but that 12% hike is $148 million shy of what the House has proposed. Senate appropri- ators endorsed NSF’s plan for a new technology directorate alongside its six existing research directorates. Appropriators toned down a geographic mandate that would require NSF to earmark 20% of its overall budget for a program to help states ranked in the bottom half of grant recipients. Instead, the spending bill tells NSF that some 20% of its planned $200 million investment in 10 new research centers to promote re- gional innovation should go to institutions in states served by the Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR). Around theWorld Brazilian Government Redirects Research Funds In January, Brazil’s research community was looking out on a picture-perfect landscape: the main funding agency, the Min- istry of Science, Technology and Innovation, put out its first “Universal Call” for research applications since 2018, gener- ating more than 8,000 research proposals. Things looked to

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Public Affairs

WHO Unveils Scientific Advisory Group on the Origins of Novel Pathogens (SAGO) The World Health Organization (WHO) has created the Scientific Advisory Group on the Origins of Novel Pathogens (SAGO) to study the origins of SARS-CoV-2, prepare for future epidemics, and promote research into emerging pathogens. The researchers proposed to be SAGO members include 26 individuals from 26 countries chosen from more than 700 applicants. Six of the nominees were members of the inter- national team that studied the origins of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic with colleagues in China. The group’s findings leaned towards a natural origin as the explanation for the outbreak, labeling the theory of a leak from a lab in Wuhan, China “extremely unlikely,” although WHO’s director-general has since stated that it is too soon to completely dismiss this possibility.

be on an upswing for research until October when Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro signed legislation redirecting 600 mil- lion reais ($106.3 million) earmarked for the Ministry, leaving Brazilian researchers in limbo. To help fund scientific research, Brazil utilizes taxes collected from industrial sectors such as biotechnology and energy towards a special fund for industrial innovation and research, the National Fund for Scientific and Technological Devel- opment (FNDCT). A portion of funds from FNDCT are then used towards the science budget. Approximately 690 million reais were expected to fund science, including 655 million from FNDCT. While funding cuts are nothing new to Brazilian researchers (research funding peaked in 2015 at 14 billion reais), this new funding reality marks the smallest investment in Brazilian research since 2004.

Connect with BPS

Call for Papers Special Issue: Biophysics of Cancer Editors: Rajini Rao, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA

Alemayehu Gorfe, University of Texas McGovern Medical School, USA Since the declaration of war on cancer five decades ago to the recent establishment of the National Cancer Institute’s RAS initiative, biophysics has played a prominent role in addressing fundamental questions related to tumor formation, growth, and migration. We are inviting contributions on experimental and computational studies of biomolecules relevant to cancer biology. These could include new experimental results, critical reviews of the state of the field, guides to the design and interpretation of experiments, and cell and molecular level explorations of the basic principles of cancer initiation and metastasis. Also of interest are articles describing the historical role and perspectives of biophysics in the study of cancer at the cellular, tissue, and organismal levels. Deadline for submission: January 31, 2022

To submit, visit https://www.editorialmanager.com/biophysical-journal/

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Publications

Know the Editor Gundula Bosch Johns Hopkins University

Editor The Biophysicist

Gundula Bosch

What are you currently working on that excites you? As the director of the R3 Center for Innovation in Science Education at Johns Hopkins, I am passionate about global graduate science education reform. We emphasize critical, integrative thinking skills that enable students to do good research according to the “three Rs” of reliable science: Rigor, Reproducibility, and Responsibility. Those core norms of sound research practice inspired the name of our R 3 science education programs that teach learners to think broadly, collaboratively, and in a less specialized manner, how to solve big, interdisciplinary problems. This allows students to practice scientific decision making based on evidence, logical reasoning, practical ethics, and effective communication. At a cocktail party of non-scientists, how would you explain what you do? Today’s students have the knowledge of the world on their cell phones, but we don’t teach them to put that knowledge into a bigger-picture context, integrate it, and communicate it, not only to peers and colleagues, but also to the public. I was originally trained in x-ray crystallography and structure-based drug design, yet not coming from an academic family back- ground, I always had to explain to family and friends what I do using the things found on a breakfast table. Now, as a full- time educational scholar in STEM and health science, I take advantage of those skills and would describe what we do in my team as “teaching science like we do science.” That term was originally coined by my dear colleague Linda Columbus for a session that we still teach at the Biophysical Society Annual Meeting. For the Johns Hopkins R 3 Program, this implies that we get inspired by Peter Medawar ’s philosophy of learning from mistakes: i.e., we teach our learners through sound error analysis where science can go wrong and how we can all work towards improvement. Thereby, it is important to look outside the rims of our petri dishes and apply what we learn in one field of research to another. Our heroes in science, such as Marie Curie and Albert Einstein , were educated like that and show us that broad thinking, everlasting curiosity, and educa- tion in the first principles of science can help us break out of our silos and make great discoveries.

BJ Editor’s Pick The TAR binding dynamics and its implication in Tat degrada- tion mechanism Shangbo Ning, Chengwei Zeng, Chen Zeng, Yunjie Zhao “This study utilized accelerated sampling technologies to study the protein-protein/protein-RNA binding dynamics, enhancing sample efficiency and magnifying the interaction changes. The strategy can be applied to study the multi-body interactions in the complex biomolecular system. In addition, we proposed a Tat degradation mechanism: the inhibitor F07#13 promotes while the inhibitor JB181 reduces the Tat degradation. It is crucial for the studies of HIV transcription regulation. The Tat degradation mechanism proposed in this work provides new insights into Tat/P-TEFb dynamical interactions and Tat transcription. Thus, the TAR RNA-related drug may be one potential solution for HIV treatment and custom-made drug design.”

Accepted Version Published November 8, 2021 DOI:https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.bpj.2021.11.006

FollowBPS Journals on Twitter @BiophysJ @BiophysReports @BiophysicistJ

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Member Corner

Members in the News Patricia Clark , University of Notre Dame and Society member since 1995, received a Director’s Award from the National Institutes of Health.

Three Society members were elected to the National Academy of Medicine: Taekjip Ha , Johns Hopkins University and Society member since 1998. Lori L. Isom , University of Michigan and Society member since 1997. Cynthia Wolberger , Johns Hopkins University and Society member since 1995.

Patricia Clark

Taekjip Ha

Lori L. Isom

Cynthia Wolberger

Student Spotlight

Marko Simic University of Graz Institute of Physics What has been the most exciting experience of your studies in biophysics?

I spend a lot of time working on theoretical relationships and modeling of different systems. It was extremely exciting to see how theoretical calculations agree with experimental data and the moment when you make the very first comparisons.

Marko Simic

Important Dates Congressional Fellowship Application Deadline Wednesday, December 15, 2021 Annual Meeting Late Abstract Submission Deadline Thursday, January 6, 2022 Annual Meeting Early Registration Deadline Thursday, January 6, 2022

Undergraduate Poster Award Competition Deadline Thursday, January 6, 2022 Just-B Poster Session Deadline Thursday, January 6, 2022 Annual Meeting Speed Networking Registration Deadline Friday, January 7, 2022

The Biophysical Society is grateful to its Industry Partners.

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For Industry Partner Membership information, contact alevine@biophysics.org.

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Career Development

Is Teamwork a Critical Determinant of Academic Success? Dear Molly Cule ,

possible because people with different expertise work together. This is perhaps especially true for our line of work, as biophys- ics is by its very nature at the interface of biology and physics (often with quite a bit of chemistry in the mix as well). So, if you look in the biophysical literature in your research area, you will likely encounter many papers in which physicists, chemists, and biologists work together, or papers where different types of biophysicists work together. For example, computational and experimental researchers can together answer more questions than they could by themselves. So, there are also those “scien- tific” reasons to approach science in a way in which you do not close yourself off from working with others, both inside your research group and outside of it. Perhaps this kind of answer feels a bit too “big picture” for someone who is still finding their footing in their graduate research project. You might not really be thinking about how to integrate your results with those from other techniques or approaches if you’re still working on getting your project off the ground. Still, there is another pragmatic consideration that you should think about at this stage of your career and training. As you move on in your career you will likely consider applying for such things as travel awards, fellowships, postdoc positions, and other jobs. You will quickly find that these often demand reference letters from people who know you and your work. Likely this was already true for your application to graduate school! Therefore, it is useful to your own future if there are ad- ditional scientists (beyond your direct advisor) who see what it is like to work with you and who can write an informed opinion on your approach to research. Thinking about this only at the end of your graduate training might be too late. I have provided some reasons to support the idea that team- work is pragmatically beneficial. I would also add that you will spend considerable time in the lab (COVID permitting) and that working with others can make the scientific process not only more effective but also much more enjoyable. Science comes with ups and downs, and both are improved if you can share them with others. One final thought: there is a significant push in the wider sci- ence community for “team science” across disciplines. None- theless, high-quality modern science still is based on the work of individual scientists each with their own expertise and expe- rience. Of course even if teamwork is integral to science, you do need to find your own niche and focus (built up with individual effort) while you work as part of a research team. Probably the best answer is also the predictable one: that you should try to find a healthy balance. Still, don’t underestimate the benefit of balancing to the side of constructive and complementary teamwork with others! — Molly Cule

I am a graduate student interested in experimental biophysics. I have joined a research lab recently, where I am seeing people take quite different ap- proaches to their research. Some peo- ple like to work alone (myself included) but others tell me that is not a good approach to take for my PhD. What

do you think? I feel like it is nice to try to figure out scientific questions myself and to take responsibility of all aspects of my experiments. Is that wrong? Sincerely, A Biophysics Graduate Student Dear Reader, The question of how to incorporate collaboration and team- work in science is always an interesting one, without a very simple answer. There are several different angles that you might consider. First of all, there are different types of “team- work.” Probably you are thinking of working together with others in your group. I will discuss that aspect first, but will also touch on the concept of modern science more broadly turning into “team science.” To start with the issue of how to work within a certain research group: like most graduate (PhD) students, you will likely be in a pre-existing research group with a supervisor (advisor/PI) along with one or more undergraduate/graduate students, postdocs, and others. During much of your prior training you might have been encouraged to work independently, to think for yourself, and to “do your own homework.” Of course, at its core much of science (and graduate school) depends on people becoming ex- perts in a technique (or research topic) by developing individual skills. This will depend on a lot of individual work and personal drive. However, you will also discover that it is not so easy (or efficient) to master all possible skills you need for your project, or to learn them by independent study. At the very least, there is much more to most experiments than a protocol—so the best way to really learn how to do something is to learn it from someone else. Be sure to ask questions! If you don’t talk to others and don’t ask questions, you can waste a lot of time on things that others may have already figured out. Naturally, if you learn from someone, you’ll be expected to also be there to help others. In other words, in-group teamwork is important to expedite and enable your biophysical research. You probably also realize that much of modern (biophysical) science is interdisciplinary and collaborative: projects become

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Career Development

University of Maryland Baltimore Biophysical Society Student Chapter Early Career Panel

The University of Maryland Baltimore Biophysical Society Stu- dent Chapter would like to thank the panelists, attendees, and everyone involved in the organization of our virtual Early Ca- reer Panel. As a chapter, we could not be more excited about the success of our inaugural event! Throughout our two-hour- long panel, 40+ students, graduate students, chapter mem- bers, and Biophysical Society members tuned in to hear the knowledge and advice provided by the panelists. Members of the audience asked many great questions ranging from advice to probing each panelist’s journey. The panelists were open, engaging, and thoughtful in all of their answers. They encouraged students and attendees to affirm themselves as scientists and biophysicists, creating a space that allowed for honest discussion and a sense of virtual community. We hope to build off this event in the future as our chapter keeps building. We would like to thank Delany Torres (Nation- al Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health), Meagan C. Small (Combat Capabilities Development Command, Army Research Laboratory), Lyna Luo (Western University of Health Sciences), Jessica A. Espino Perez (GlaxoSmithKline), and Emily Chea (GenNext Technologies) for their time and for being a part of our inaugural event! Grants & Opportunities The James Corones Award in Leadership, Community Building, and Communication This award was established to recognize the impact of mid-career scientists and engineers in their chosen fields. The recipient will be someone who encourages and men- tors young people to be active in the science community, to communicate their work effectively, and to make a difference in their scientific area. Who can apply: Mid-career is defined as those having earned a PhD within the past 10 to 20 years. Deadline: December 31, 2021 Website: https:/www.krellinst.org/about-krell/ corones-award Numbers By the

There are currently 40 BPS Student Chapters around the world, including 9 chapters outside of the United States.

The Robert A. Welch Award in Chemistry The purpose of this award is to foster and encourage basic chemical research contributions for the benefit of humankind. Who can apply: No self-nominations are allowed. Deadline: January 31, 2022 Website: https:/welch1.org/awards/welch-award-in- chemistry/welch-award-guidelines

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Annual Meeting

Share Your Science with Colleagues New and Old

Thank you to our sponsors: Axiom Optics Beckman Coulter Life Sciences Bruker Carl Zeiss Microscopy LLC Cell Press Chroma Technology Curi Bio Dynamic Biosensors Elements srl IOP Publishing Journal of General Physiology (JGP) LEICA MICROSYSTEMS INC LUMICKS Mad City Labs Inc

Late Abstract Deadline: January 6, 2022 Do you have research findings you are ready to share but missed the early abstracts deadline? Submit a late abstract to receive valuable feedback and to be included along with the abstracts submitted by the October 1 deadline.

Did You Receive Your Programming Notice? Programming notices were sent the week of November 21 to those who submitted abstracts by the October 1 deadline. Check your email and contact the Society Office if you did not receive notification.

Abstracts Programmed Once again, we held the programming meeting virtually rather than in person. Prior to the meeting and following the regular abstract submission deadline, members of the Program Committee and Council reviewed and sorted submitted abstracts, which were programmed into 63 platforms and 105 poster sessions. Over 500 posters will be presented each day of the meeting. BPS members finalized the programming of platform and poster sessions for the 2022 Annual Meeting. Members and staff participating in this virtual meeting:

Malvern Panalytical Nanion Technologies Nikon Instruments Physics Today Sophion Bioscience A/S Sutter Instrument

Student Volunteers Undergraduate and graduate students—volunteer your time at the Annual Meeting in exchange for complimentary meeting reg- istration. Visit https:/www.biophysics. org/2022meeting/general-info/ student-volunteers for more information. Application deadline: January 6, 2022.

Left to right starting with the top row: Janice Robertson, Umi Zhou, Bill Kobertz, Patricia Bassereau, James Sellers, Jennifer Fraser, Joseph Mindell, Jennifer Pesanelli, Baron Chandra, Elizabeth Komives, Arthur Palmer, III, and Dorothy Chaconas.

The Society would like to thank the Program Committee, Council, and members who participated in the planning, reviewing, sorting, and programming this year. Their work ensures that the final program reflects the breadth of research areas in biophysics with as few programming conflicts as possible. The 2022 Program Committee members are Elizabeth Komives , Arthur Palmer , Michelle Digman , Teresa Giraldez , Anna Moroni , and Jennifer Ross .

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Annual Meeting

Calling All Bloggers! Deadline to apply: January 17 Share Your Perspective on the Meeting

osition. Preparing scientific research institutions for the next pandemic cannot be delayed, as the consequences of lab shutdowns and COVID-imposed research hiatuses have been unevenly felt among researchers and recovery is still ongoing. Luckily, many lessons regarding the management of the scientific research endeavor were learned by inves- tigators, administrators, and institutions during the current pandemic. Join PAC for an in-depth panel discussion on how we as scientists can use the takeaways from the previous two years to prepare for the next pandemic. This panel will fea- ture scientists and administrators in various stages of their careers, discussing how to assist labs in lessening the burden of shutdowns, from staffing to tenure to facilities to travel to lost research time. The outcome of this panel discussion will be an update to the Society’s white paper on Pandemic Preparedness. On-Demand Annual Meeting Content Unable to attend the in-person Annual Meeting? We have on-demand content for you! We are excited to be in person for the 66th Annual Meeting; however, we realize that some of you might not be able to attend. The Society is pleased to invite you to register for Annual Meeting on-demand content to keep you connected. Content will include: • 2022 Biophysical Society Lecturer, Frances Arnold , California Institute of Technology • 18 Subgroup Symposia • 4 Workshops • Society Awardee Talks • ePoster Gallery (includes 2,300 posters programmed for in-person presentation) Registration will open December 6, 2021, and close February 28, 2022, and will be accessible for viewing March 14–April 30, 2022. Visit the Annual Meeting website (www.biophysics. org/2022meeting/registration) for more information and to register. Full access to on-demand content is included in the in-person registration fee. The ePoster gallery will be available to in-person registrants beginning February 14 to allow viewing before arriving in San Francisco.

Interested in sharing your experiences at the Annual Meeting? Looking to expand your writing experience? BPS is looking for a diverse group of five to ten bloggers to share their personal experiences at the meeting with the Society’s 3,500-plus blog readers. Blog posts could focus on meeting tips, must-go-to events, the best local eateries, how you are navigating the meeting, or what you have learned. You can review posts from the 2020 meeting at www.biophysics.org/blog/category/annual-meeting-2020. To learn more and to submit your application, visit www.surveymonkey.com/r/2022AMbloggers. Public Affairs Sessions The Public Affairs Committee (PAC) will present two sessions on the mechanisms behind science policy, research funding, and how we can work together to better shape the future of science. People or Projects? Approaches to Funding Research Sunday, February 20, 2:30 pm –4:00 pm Join PAC for a panel on the changing landscape of scientific research funding around the globe. As scientific research continues to grow and advance with new, groundbreaking techniques, tools, and mechanisms, we are also seeing a new evolution in how this research is funded. For exam- ple, the United States, through its proposed creation of the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H), and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, through the Leap initia- tive, are pushing forward high-risk, high-reward biomedical research. Through need and necessity, the United Kingdom must reinvest in itself to carve out funding for research. Over the past 15 years, France has moved to grant-based funding for scientific research. This session will explore how we, as scientists, navigate the line between funding people versus funding projects. Beyond Coronavirus: Preparing for the Next Pandemic Monday, February 21, 1:00 pm –2:30 pm As scientists, we know that the question of whether there will be another pandemic is not an “if” but a “when” prop-

biophysics.org/ 2022meeting

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Cheers for Volunteers

Michaela Jansen Committee for Professional Opportunities for Women (CPOW)

Michaela Jansen

Is this your first volunteer position for BPS? If not, what other positions have you held? I have been a member of Committee for Professional Oppor- tunities for Women (CPOW) since 2018. Just prior to that I served as Chair for a Subgroup Name Change Committee for the Permeation and Transport Subgroup. This was a short and maybe successful stint, since the Subgroup is now called BPS’s CPOW is a group with tremendously committed and talented individuals. Previous and current members have in- spired me to join this committee. “CPOW was charged by BPS to promote a culture of excellence, fairness, inclusion, and diversity; to highlight contributions by women biophysicists; to educate girls and women; and to assist the advancement and retention of women biophysicists.” ( Is CPOW Still Relevant? by Gabriela Popescu , www.biophysics.org/blog/is-cpow-still- relevant). I volunteer because this mission is so important, and even more crucial in light of the COVID-19 impact on the (academic) workforce. What has been a highlight from your volunteer experience? During the BPS Annual Meeting in 2019 in Baltimore, I attended the Travel Award Reception. Interacting with the junior colleagues, mostly graduate students from different “Membrane Transport.” Why do you volunteer?

graduate schools all over the country and the world, was very energizing. For many it was their first BPS meeting and also their first international meeting. Their excitement about being at this meeting is exactly what I feel each time I pack up to go. It is always a highlight to look the future in the eye! Do you have advice for others who might be thinking about volunteering? I find it important to give back to our local, regional, and (inter)national groups of professional societies and groups in general. When thinking about volunteering, the best oppor- tunities are those that are close to our heart and that interest us. Investing time in a topic of interest is a process that gives more energy back than it takes. When not volunteering for BPS, what do you work on? My lab studies pentameric ligand-gated ion channels with a focus on the intracellular domain’s contributions to struc- ture, assembly, and function, and additionally on the mo- lecular mechanisms of drugs binding to these receptors. We also work on different solute transporters for vitamins and nucleosides. Outside of work, I enjoy spending time with my family of four humans, two dogs, and five chickens. Favorite family activities include hiking in Caprock Canyon or Palo Duro Canyon. I also like running and to a lesser extent the other triathlon disciplines of swimming and biking.

Mark Your Calendars and Plan to Participate in the 7th Annual BiophysicsWeek

Celebrate and promote biophysics by planning an event. Biophysics Week is a global campaign to increase public awareness and support for biophysics research. Every year, the Biophysical Society, along with Biophysics Week Part- ners and Affiliate Event Organizers, hosts events and activities in communities around the world all week long. We are looking forward to celebrating Biophysics Week 2022 with you!

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