Biophysical Society Bulletin | October 2021

October 2021

T H E N E W S L E T T E R O F T H E B I O P H Y S I C A L S O C I E T Y

Ten Outstanding Biophysicists Receive BPS Honors The Biophysical Society is pleased to recognize the following 2022 award recipients. These members will be honored during the 66th Annual Meeting in February.

Patricia Bassereau

Dorothy Beckett Stephen C. Cannon

Bridget Carragher

WilliamDowhan

Suckjoon Jun

Gabriela Schlau-Cohen

Paul R. Selvin

Timothy A. Springer

ShimonWeiss

Patricia Bassereau, Institut Curie, France, will receive the Avanti Award in Lipids for her stellar work on membrane lipid organization and mechanics. Dorothy Beckett, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH, USA, will receive the Rosalba Kampman Distinguished Service Award for serving the Biophysical Society energetically and thoughtfully in many leadership roles, and for bringing a fierce and outspoken commitment to equity, breadth, and opportunity for all members of our worldwide Society in all fields of biophysics. Stephen C. Cannon, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, will receive the BPS Award in the Biophysics of Health and Disease for groundbreaking discoveries in the biophysical elucidation of channelopathies of sodium and calcium channels, including hyperkalemic and hypokalemic periodic paralysis, and for using this understanding to design clinical trials to treat these disorders.

Bridget Carragher, New York Structural Biology Center, USA, will receive the Innovation Award for developing inkjet deposition and vitrification technology for cryo-EM. William Dowhan, University of Texas Health Science Center, USA, will receive the Anatrace Membrane Protein Award for his seminal contributions towards understanding lipid regulation of integral membrane protein topology. Suckjoon Jun, University of California, San Diego, USA, will receive the Michael and Kate Bárány Award for Young Investigators for groundbreaking research on the biophysical mechanisms of bacterial cell size control. Gabriela Schlau-Cohen, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, will receive the Margaret Oakley Dayhoff Award for elucidating structural and energetic dynamics of biological and bio-inspired systems through her innovative applications of spectroscopic methods.

Inside

Paul R. Selvin, University of Illinois, Urba- na-Champaign, USA, will receive the Ig- nacio Tinoco Award for novel and ongoing contributions to development of sin- gle-molecule biophysics and application to important biophysical research problems. Timothy A. Springer, Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard University, USA, will receive the Founders Award for pioneering contributions to biophysical studies of immune cell rolling, activation, and adhesion and for revealing the force-based activation of integrins through an innovative combination of structural biology, single-molecule mechanical measurements, and thermodynamic analysis.

Shimon Weiss, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, will receive the Kazuhiko Kinosita Award in Single-Molecule Biophysics for trailblazing contributions to the field of single-molecule florescence detection biophysics.

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President’s Message

Get Involved

Biophysicist in Profile

Public Affairs Publications Annual Meeting

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Cheers for Volunteers

Member Corner

Career Development

Communities

Upcoming Events

President’s Message

Be excellent to each other

At the Biophysical Society (BPS) Spring Council meeting in early June, and in accordance with Article VIII of the BPS Bylaws, the BPS Council passed a motion to amend the By- laws (https:/www.biophysics.org/ About-BPS/Governance/Bylaws). The main purpose of the amend- ments is to codify the authority of the Council to establish and en-

BPS members should demonstrate respect for each other and exhibit appropriate professional conduct in their interactions with all individuals they encounter in connection with their professional roles, including colleagues, students, research- ers, support staff, grantors, administrators, and others in the academic or research community. Non-members of BPS in- volved in BPS activities must also exhibit professional conduct in connection with those activities. Although there is a Code of Conduct (https:/www.biophysics. org/code-of-conduct), which includes reporting of violations with respect to inappropriate behavior at BPS meetings and BPS-sponsored activities, we do not have Ethics Guidelines in place. At present, Council has convened a task force that is moving forward with the policy work. Once the Ethics Guide- lines are completed, this task force will tackle a Revocation Policy to allow for action against award recipients and fellows who fail to meet BPS’s expectations for professional conduct. All BPS Award recipients and Fellows are expected to adhere to commonly held standards of professional ethics and sci- entific integrity. In the very rare case in which these expecta- tions are not met, BPS needs to set up guidelines and pro- cedures to be followed to request revocation of a previously bestowed honor. In August, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Board Chair Claire Fraser sent an all-member email announcing the AAAS revocation policy (https:/www.aaas.org/aaas-awards/revocation-process) and reminding us that: “While not the only interest that is critical for excellence in the STEMM enterprise and is considered by AAAS in deciding who should be granted an Award, profes- sional ethics is an important such interest.” As scientists, we are constantly reminded of the need for excellence in research but sometimes forget to apply the same standards in our interactions with one another. I see kindness as a strength, and there is no need to be rude when criticizing the work of our colleagues. I am sure many of us, like myself, feel devastated when our papers or grants are rejected, but this is compounded when the reviewer is disre- spectful. I ask that all BPS members treat one another with respect and, in the words of Bill and Ted from the movie Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure : “Be excellent to each other!” Ethics Guidelines together with a draft of a Revocation Policy for awards and fellows is proposed to be sent to BPS Council for our Fall meeting. Please let me know if you have other policy priorities or concerns at fs@unimelb.edu.au. — Frances Separovic , President

Frances Separovic

force policies and procedures for eligibility for membership and other BPS roles, and to underscore that members must comply with the Society’s policies and procedures. I’m pleased to report that 96% of the BPS members voting on the Bylaws change voted in favor. Hence, Article III and Article XV will be amended to read as follows (additions in italics): ARTICLE III: Membership in the Biophysical Society shall be open to scientists who share the stated purpose of the Soci- ety, who have educational, research, or practical experience in biophysics or in an allied scientific field, and who comply with the policies and procedures of the Biophysical Society . ARTICLE XV now includes an extra sentence: The Council may establish and enforce policies and procedures for eligibility for membership, volunteer leader positions, and awards, for the con- duct of members, volunteers, Committee members, officers, and Council members, for disciplinary action, suspension, or revocation of membership or awards, and for removal of an officer, volunteer, Committee member, or Council member. In addition, the amendments add headings to Article XIV (Committees and Task Forces) and Article XIX (Subgroups). A comparison of the pre-existing to the amended Bylaws is available at https:/ bit.ly/3kbb9OI. The revised Bylaws will aid BPS in fulfilling our mission of supporting biophysicists across the world. The Society aspires to adhere to high ethical standards and expects ethical be- havior from all our members. As members, we commit to the BPS values set forth as part of the Society’s Mission & Vision (https:/www.biophysics.org/about-bps/mission-vision): • Scientific excellence, • Integrity and transparency, • Diversity, equity and inclusion; and • Community building

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Get Involved

Officers President Frances Separovic President-Elect Gail Robertson Past-President Catherine A. Royer Secretary Erin Sheets Treasurer Samantha Harris Council Henry Colecraft Michelle A. Digman Erin C. Dueber Marta Filizola Gilad Haran Kumiko Hayashi Francesca Marassi

Start a BPS Student Chapter at Your Institution! Apply to form a Biophysical Society (BPS) Student Chapter! Participation in the Student Chapter Program allows students to sharpen their leadership skills and be part of a worldwide network that helps to promote the field of biophysics within local communities. BPS Student Chapters are led by students and provide members with opportunities for professional development to enhance their academic experience. Chapters may be formed within a single institution, or regional Chapters may be developed among multiple, neighboring institutions anywhere in the world. Approved Chapters can also receive up to $200 USD in reimbursable expenses to assist with getting started.

Susan Marqusee Joseph A. Mindell Carolyn A. Moores Kandice Tanner Biophysical Journal Jane Dyson Editor-in-Chief The Biophysicist Sam Safran Editor-in-Chief Biophysical Reports

Advisors, do not miss this opportunity to help support the next generation of biophysicists. Share this exciting opportunity with students in your department and consider serving as a Chapter Sponsor. As a Chapter Sponsor, you will provide professional guidance, practical advice, and assistance to students. For more information, a complete list of instructions on forming a BPS Student Chapter, and a list of existing Chapters, visit www.biophysics.org/student-chapters. Applications will be accepted through November 12, 2021. Questions can be directed to Margaret Mainguy at mmainguy@biophysics.org. Applicants will be notified in December regarding the status of their application.

Jörg Enderlein Editor-in-Chief

Society Office Jennifer Pesanelli Executive Officer Newsletter Executive Editor Jennifer Pesanelli Managing Editor John Long

Production Catie Curry Ray Wolfe Proofreader/Copy Editor Laura Phelan The Biophysical Society Newsletter (ISSN 0006-3495) is published eleven times per year, January-December, by the Biophysical Society, 5515 Security Lane, Suite 1110, Rockville, Maryland 20852. Distributed to USA members and other countries at no cost. Cana- dian GST No. 898477062. Postmaster: Send address changes to Biophysical Society, 5515 Security Lane, Suite 1110, Rockville, MD 20852. Copyright © 2021 by the Biophysical Society.

Get Involved. The Biophysical Society (BPS) provides many opportunities for members to get involved and give back to the biophysics community.

To learn more about the different opportunities, please visit www.biophysics.org/get-involved.

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Biophysicist in Profile

R. Mahalakshmi Area of Research Membrane Protein Biophysics

Institution Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhopal

At-a-Glance

As a young student, R. Mahalakshmi strongly disliked biology, instead showing a strong preference for math and physics. After studying biology in her senior secondary education, she transitioned toward a career in biophysics and never looked back.

R. Mahalakshmi

R. Mahalakshmi grew up in Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India. “This city is called the ‘Manchester of South India,’” she says. “One lesser-known fact about Coimbatore is how extraordi- narily polite and courteous the people there are, and how they go out of their way to help others.” She grew up dreaming of serving as a pilot in the Indian Air Force. It sounded like a career path that would make the most of her math and science skills. “I was very good at mathe- matics and physics in school, and my interest slowly shifted to astrophysics. Biology was not something I was interested in—in fact, I used to hate that subject!” she shares. “A series of coincidences landed me as a biology major in senior sec- ondary education.” From that point, she had a slow transition toward becoming a biophysicist. Her father was a businessperson and her mother a home- maker. Both parents prioritized her education over everything else and encouraged her intellectual freedom. “They trained me to question every norm (from day-to-day activities to international policies), understand the logic behind every decision, and to question anything that was illogical. I owe it to them that, even today, I am unafraid to boldly experiment with new areas, challenge established conventions, and think beyond what is generally accepted as correct,” she explains. Mahalakshmi attended PSG College of Arts & Science for her undergraduate studies, receiving her bachelor of science de- gree in biochemistry in 2000. She then pursued her master’s degree in biological sciences, followed by her PhD in molec- ular biophysics, both from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (IISc). “I was fascinated by protein biochemistry in college. I still remember reading a newspaper article pinned on the bulletin board of my department, on ammonia trans- porters. From there, my childhood fascination for physics and mathematics re-emerged when I joined the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, as an integrated PhD student. I graduated from the Molecular Biophysics Unit at IISc, and there has been no turning back since then!” she declares. “I draw inspiration from my PhD mentor P. Balaram even today. My interests in protein folding and protein biophysics are reinvigorated with

every discussion I have over coffee with my best friend, col- league, and husband, Vikas Jain .” After completing her PhD, she undertook a postdoctoral posi- tion in Francesca Marassi’s lab in the Department of Apoptosis and Cell Death Research at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship with Carl F. Ware and Dirk M. Zajonc in the Division of Molecular Immunology at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology, both in San Diego, California. She accepted a position in 2009 as an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhopal, becoming an as- sociate professor in 2014. Since June 2021, Mahalakshmi has been a full professor in the same department. Her research focus areas include mitochondrial membrane protein folding and function, membrane protein regulation in cancer and neurodegeneration, and molecular experimental biophysics. Specifically, her lab works on understanding spatiotemporal dynamics of mitochondrial macromolecular machines in cel- lular bioenergetics and pathophysiology, molecular architec- ture of human mitochondrial membrane translocases and assembly machinery, and molecular effectors of beta-barrel membrane protein biogenesis, misfolding, and aggregation. “With biophysics, every day is a discovery,” she says. “Each day takes me one step closer towards understanding how transmembrane beta-barrel membrane proteins assemble, and how their folded scaffold relates to their function.” She approaches challenges as opportunities to expand her knowledge and enhance her abilities. “I believe I can face any scientific or academic challenge with my positivity, determi- nation, tenacity, and the support of my family, mentors, and team,” Mahalakshmi shares. In the future, she expects that biophysics will contribute to advancements in healthcare and technology to an even great- er degree. “The ability of biophysical approaches to integrate single molecule studies with whole-cell and whole-organism data will provide unprecedented information on the function

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Biophysicist in Profile

and regulation of molecular machines in atomistic detail. In addition to helping alleviate disease states, I envision the util- ity of biophysics in designing molecular machines for futur- istic applications. I hope to be able to contribute by deducing the mysteries of membrane protein folding—particularly the beta-barrels of human mitochondrial membranes—and their function.” Mahalakshmi serves on the BPS-IOP Advisory Board, a group of scientists tasked with guiding the direction and growth of the Biophysical Society’s eBooks program. Her time in that role and her participation in the Annual Meeting over the years has helped her network with peers who share her passion for biophysical studies of biomolecules. She explains, “The Biophysical Society provides me with excellent avenues and multiple choices to discuss research topics I find interest- ing—the perfect venue to brainstorm on newer and uncon- ventional ideas and interact with scientists from all over the world.”

When she is not working, she enjoys playing badminton, jogging, photography, and solving sudoku puzzles. “Time permitting, I also occasionally cook and do gardening,” she says. Her advice to those just starting out in their careers in biophysics is a tenet she tries to live by as well: “Always be open minded and be eager to learn from anyone.” Profiles in Biophysics No two biophysicists have the same story. Read about the many paths that led each of them to become a biophysicist. www.biophysics.org/profiles-in-biophysics

Submit or sponsor an abstract and get reduced registration rates for the upcoming BPS 66 th Annual Meeting in San Francisco, California, February 19-23, 2022.

Learn and keep up to date with the latest in biophysics with Biophysical Journal , The Biophysicist , Biophysical Reports , and the BPS Bulletin .

Explore education and career resources including BPS webinars, video library, the BPS Job Board, and more.

Share your science, expand your network, and find collaborations through BPS Subgroups, meetings, networking events, the PUI Network, and Student Chapters.

Strengthen your leadership skills by volunteering and supporting the global biophysics community.

Check out exciting new programming, explore expandedmember benefits, and conveniently renew your 2022membership online. www.biophysics.org/ RENEW

October 2021

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Public Affairs

HowDoes Congress Decide on the Annual Spending of Our Tax Dollars?

consideration. However, before this process can begin, Con- gress must have authorizing legislation in place. Authorizing legislation confirms the existence and roles of the agencies of the government and sets out the general range of sums that can be allocated in the coming year. These bills often cover years at a time, and do not need to pass annually. The Congressional Budget Resolution is a critically important document as it sets the total level of discretionary funding for the next fiscal year; this is known as the 302(A) allocation. This legislation is prepared by the Budget Committees of the House and Senate and outlines spending levels among the twelve Appropriations Subcommittees, known as 302(B) allocations. Final Appropriations bills are supposed to be complete by June 30; however, if this process has not been completed by October 1, the end of the prior budget year, Congress can pass a Continuing Resolution that continues the levels of spending of the prior budget year. What Factors Control Overall Budget Allocations? The division of the budget follows the influence of major economic and social constituencies in US society. The Na- tional Association of Homebuilders presses for more housing spending; the Pharmaceutical Manufacturer’s Association generally supports NIH budgets, but opposes increases in regulations and cost controls on medical care; the broad width of industry, professional societies, and interest groups are all represented in some form or fashion in an effort to influence policy or appropriations. The Biophysical Society (BPS) works together in coalitions with a number of biomedical research groups, professional medical societies, and patient advocacy groups. Among the most important of these are the Ad Hoc Coalition for Medical Research, the Coalition for Health Funding, the Coalition for National Science Funding, and the Energy Sciences Coalition. In the coming months, the Public Affairs Committee will report to you on our relations with other allied groups in more detail, as well as on our plans to increase the scope and effectiveness of our basic and biomedical research advocacy efforts. To get involved in BPS advocacy, please visit

In the United States, the clearest and deepest expressions of our national priorities are the annual budgets voted on by our Senators and Representatives. However, the budget process is generally much less well understood than the passing of legislation. Before the coronavirus outbreak, Congress had allotted about $42 billion to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), approximately 4% of the total Congressional discre- tionary budget, compared with, for example, the $738 billion authorized for the Department of Defense, which amounts to more than 50% of the entire Congressional discretionary budget. That NIH budget was clearly unprepared to deal with a global pandemic. Let’s review first the standard Congressional budget pro- cess and the important distinction between mandatory and discretionary spending—which Congress appropriates each year. In the overall budget, the majority of spending goes to the major mandatory programs, most notably Social Security and Medicare. These are, in effect, trust funds—meaning the funds cannot be used for any other federal expenses. The budget category most relevant to the scientific community is the non-defense discretionary (NDD) budget, which excludes the mandatory programs and debt payments but includes all other expenditures. The Annual Budget Process The federal budget year, or fiscal year, begins on October 1 and ends on September 30. The budget allocation process begins with the president introducing his budget proposals. While these proposals have no legal standing, they may influ- ence the Congressional debate. The majority party in the House and Senate then brings forth their budget proposals—known as a budget resolution—for

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Public Affairs

https:/www.biophysics.org/Policy-Advocacy/Take-Action or contact Leann Fox at LFox@biophysics.org. — Jonathan King and Eric Sundberg , Biophysical Society Public Affairs Committee Around theWorld Afghan Researchers Fear for Their Safety Following the Taliban’s recent lightning-fast takeover of Af- ghanistan, many scientists are trying to flee the anti-science regime. After the Taliban’s ouster in 2001 at the start of the U.S.-led invasion, the country’s higher education institutions burgeoned from a handful to more than 100, and women entered the workforce en masse. Leaders of the Taliban insist they have moderated their views, but few Afghans are willing to take those reassurances at face value. European and U.S. officials have scrambled to get hundreds of Afghan scholars and their families onto flights out of Kabul. However, reaching the airport meant running a gauntlet of Taliban fighters roam- ing Kabul’s streets and passing several checkpoints. Scientists stranded outside the capital have said it was too dangerous to travel to Kabul in the final days of the U.S. military pres- ence. For now, though, many U.S. institutions are trying to protect former collaborators by purging their websites and social me- dia accounts of any mention of past cooperation, for fear of retaliation against those individuals by the Taliban. In addition, they are coordinating with Biden administration officials and Congress on how to steer scholars to safe harbors. Major U.K. Science Funder to Require Grantees toMake Papers Immediately Free The United Kingdom currently has one of the highest rates of open access publication in the world, with many researchers posting their research papers on websites that make them publicly available for free. But the country’s leading funding agency, UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), announced a new policy that will push open access even further by mandating that all research it funds must be freely available for anyone to read upon publication. UKRI will expand on existing rules covering all research papers produced from its £8 billion in annual funding. About three quarters of papers recently published from U.K. universities are open access, and UKRI’s current policy gives scholars

two routes to comply: pay journals for “gold” open access, which makes a paper free to read on the publisher’s website immediately, or choose the “green” route, which allows them to deposit a near-final version of the paper on a public reposi- tory, after a waiting period of up to one year. Some publishers have insisted that an embargo period is necessary to prevent the free papers from peeling away their subscribers. However, starting in April 2022, that year-long delay will no longer be permitted: researchers choosing green open access must deposit the paper immediately when it is published. And publishers won’t be able to hang on to the copyright for UKRI-funded papers. The agency will require that the research it funds—with some minor exceptions—be pub- lished with a Creative Commons Attribution license (known as CC-BY) that allows for free and liberal distribution of the work. The policy falls closely in line with those issued by other major research funders, including the nonprofit Wellcome Trust and the European Research Council. UKRI says it will unveil more details of the policy in Novem- ber. It has not yet said, for example, whether it will fund gold open access fees for journals that have made some open access commitments but are not covered by a full transition- al agreement approved by Jisc, a nonprofit U.K. group that negotiates journal subscriptions on behalf of universities. Some publishers have resisted the new requirements. The Publishers Association, a member organization for the U.K. publishing industry, circulated a document saying the policy would introduce confusion for researchers, threaten their academic freedom, undermine open access, and leave many researchers on the hook for fees for gold open access—which it calls the only viable route for researchers.

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Publications

Know the Editor Helmut Schiessel

Technische Universität Dresden

Editor, Genome Biophysics Biophysical Journal

Helmut Schiessel

What are you currently working on that excites you? This year, I joined the newly founded Cluster of Excellence Physics of Life in Dresden. This new environment inspired some new ideas about how cells manage to duplicate them- selves. This is trivial for DNA, but what about the epigenetic state? For instance, half of the various post-translational modifications on the nucleosomes are lost during cell division. I am trying to understand the mechanism that restores the original state, which involves polymer physics and protein droplets. My hope is that epigenetics is often based on simple physics. It’s exciting to be at the early stages of a project when you can just get a first glimpse of where it’s going. At a cocktail party of non-scientists, how would you explain what you do? I am obsessed with all sorts of information written along the DNA, but not to the extent that I monologue people at a cock- tail party! If asked, I would compare biological cells with radio receivers. The latter selects a single radio program from the multiplexed radio waves. Similarly, a cell “listens” to what is written on its DNA. By turning the receiver’s dial, you can turn on different programs while the cell uses different machines to read the different layers of information. One layer contains the genes, another mechanical information that controls the DNA’s own packaging, and another the speed of protein production, which affects the quality of the product. I’m trying to show that all of this information can be written along the same stretch of DNA, and that this actually happens on real genomes.

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BJ Editor’s Pick Light scattering in TIRF microscopy: A theoretical study of the limits to surface selectivity Jeremy J. Axelrod, Daniel Axelrod “Techniques that employ illumination of a microscopic sample by an evanescent field (most commonly by total internal reflection fluorescence) are surface selective because the evanescent field layer ideally is very thin. However, refractive index inhomogeneities in the sample can scatter some of the illumination, increase its effective thickness, and thereby decrement the surface selectivity. From a theoretical optics viewpoint, this work examines how significant this problem might be on typical samples, such as living cell cultures.”

Version of Record Published June 29, 2021 DOI:https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.bpj.2021.06.025

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BPS Twitter followers have increased by 177% since 2016.

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Publications

Biophysical Reports Publishes Its First Issue Issue 1 of Biophysical Reports is now available at www.biophysreports.org! The Biophysical Society’s new Gold Open Access journal opened for submissions early in 2021, and thanks to eager authors and our hard-working editorial board, peer reviewers, and publications staff, we were able to publish enough articles for the first issue in a little over six months. Getting a new journal off the ground is a difficult task, and everyone involved can be proud of this accomplish- ment. A special thank you goes to Editor-in-Chief Jörg Ender- lein for setting the tone for the journal and leading it through its early days. The journal aims to bring together new advances in research methods, tools, and techniques in biophysics, including short contributions (Letters and Reports) with rapid turnarounds, as well as Research Articles and Reviews. It provides another option for researchers to publish their biophysics work, par- ticularly those who are mandated to publish in open access journals.

The first articles include a very clever and powerful new method for spectrally resolved single-molecule imaging that allows for the identification and classifica- tion of individual fluorescent molecules on the basis of their emission spectrum (Jeffet et al.); an important technique for drift correc-

tion in single-molecule localization microscopy, providing a solution to a long-standing and vexing problem in wide-field super-resolution microscopy (Fazekas et al.); and a report on the recoding of membrane potentials by using fluorescent nanodiscs, a technique that could have broad applications in the biophysics of neurons (Grupi et al.). For more information about the journal, its scope, and how to submit your work, please visit www.biophysreports.org. Go to https:/ info.cell.com/biophysical-reports-registration to sign up for alerts about future issues of Biophysical Reports.

The Biophysical Society is grateful to its Industry Partners.

For Industry Partner Membership information, contact alevine@biophysics.org. SILVER

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Annual Meeting

Student Opportunities

Thank you to our sponsors: Axiom Optics Beckman Coulter Life Sciences Bruker Carl Zeiss Microscopy LLC Cell Press Chroma Technology Curi Bio Elements srl IOP Publishing Journal of General Physiology (JGP) LEICA MICROSYSTEMS INC LUMICKS Mad City Labs Inc

Are you a student or are you a faculty member planning to bring your students to San Francisco? Look at the sessions planned throughout the meeting to provide undergradu- ate and graduate students with opportunities to network with faculty members and oth- er students from around the world to explore a variety of career paths after graduation. Undergraduate Poster Award Competition Saturday, February 19, 3:00 pm –5:00 pm , USA Pacific

valuable networking and social opportunity to meet other students, BPS Committee members, and scientists at all career levels to discuss academic goals and questions, and to develop a biophysics career path. Space for this event is limited to the first 100 attendees. Education and Career Opportunities Fair Sunday, February 20, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm , USA Pacific Starting to look for a postdoc position? Or maybe you’re an undergraduate thinking about grad school? Check out the Educa- tion and Career Opportunities Fair. Student attendees are invited to meet with repre- sentatives from educational institutions as well as industry and government agencies. Find out about open postdoc positions and laboratories seeking graduate students at universities with leading programs in biophysics. Stop by the fair to learn about the variety of opportunities available and talk one-on-one with representatives from participating institutions.

Practice your presentation and communi- cation skills at the Undergraduate Poster Award Competition! If you’re an under- graduate student, plan on attending this competition. This is an exciting opportunity for you to showcase your scientific project, interact with your fellow students, and learn more about the field of biophysics. Having the chance to present in a wel- coming environment also takes away the stress of a more formal setting, before the general poster session begins. Up to six contestants will receive $100. For more in- formation, please visit the Annual Meeting Professional Development and Networking page at https:/www.biophysics.org/ 2022meeting/program/professional-de- velopment-networking. Pre-registration is required to participate. Undergraduate Student Pizza “Breakfast” Sunday, February 20, 11:30 am –1:00 pm , USA Pacific Does pizza, biophysics, and a Q&A session sound appealing? Then plan to attend the Undergraduate Student Pizza “Break- fast” session. This event gives students a

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Did you know…. Student members can take advantage of reduced meeting registration and membership rates. Have your students submit an abstract and join the Biophysical Society today!

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Annual Meeting

Graduate Student Breakfast Monday, February 21, 7:30 am –8:30 am , USA Pacific Graduate students, start your morning right with the Early Careers Committee! This is a great opportunity to network with your peers to talk about issues that arise in your current career stage. Committee members will share information and answer questions about resources available to you and how the committee serves graduate students in the biophysics community. Space for this event is limited to the first 100 attendees. Annual Meeting of the Student Chapters Monday, February 21, 11:00 am –1:00 pm , USA Pacific BPS Student Chapter members and students interested in joining a Chapter are highly encouraged to attend the Student Chapter Meeting! There will be opportunities to engage with other students and Chapter leaders from all over the world. Leadership development is an integral part of the Student Chapter program, and this is the session to attend if you are looking to contribute to that discussion or learn more about

Undergraduate Student Lounge Need a quiet space to study or work on assignments for your courses? Or maybe you want to meet other undergraduate attendees? Stop by the Undergraduate Student Lounge, a room specifically reserved for undergraduate students to do classwork and make connections. The lounge is open throughout the meeting and Wi-Fi is available. Student Housing Deadline: December 7 Affordable housing is available for undergraduate student at- tendees who are current Society members. To secure student housing, visit the Annual Meeting website. Student Volunteers The Biophysical Society invites undergraduate and graduate students to volunteer time at the Annual Meeting in exchange for complimentary meeting registration. Volunteers must be Society members with registration fully paid and must be willing to volunteer six hours during the meeting. To apply, please send an email to meetings@biophysics.org by January 6, 2022, with the following information: full name, cell phone number, and complete list of dates/times available. Those se- lected will have their registration refunded after the meeting. Call for Future of Biophysics SymposiumSpeakers Know a young researcher doing cutting-edge research at the interface of the physical and life sciences? The Biophysical Society is seeking suggestions from you for speakers to be featured in the special Future of Biophysics Burroughs Wellcome Fund Symposium in San Francisco. If you have a colleague who may be suitable for a nomination, visit https:/www.surveymonkey.com/r/GNPPND9 and complete the required information fields by October 18, 2021.

what Student Chapters are all about. JUST-B Poster Session Monday, February 21, 3:00 pm –5:00 pm , USA Pacific

The inaugural Justice for Underrepresented Scholars Train- ing in Biophysics (JUST-B) Poster Session will celebrate the achievements of underrepresented and underserved stu- dents, postdocs, and early career researchers in the field of biophysics. The poster session will promote participants’ re- search, offer networking opportunities, and serve as a recruit- ment venue. The goal is to address and mitigate inequities in the biophysics community by providing a space for underrep- resented trainees to share their scientific accomplishments and take steps toward advancing their careers. For more information and to apply, please visit https:/www.biophysics. org/education-careers/just-b-poster-session. Registration deadline: January 6, 2022.

International Travel: U.S. Easing Restrictions for Vaccinated Tourists The United States announced that vaccinated foreign travelers will be allowed entry into the United States begin- ning in early November. Travelers will need to show proof of full vaccination prior to boarding U.S.-bound planes. A COVID-19 test will also continue to be required within three days of flight and proof of negative results must be shown. Fully vaccinated passengers will not be required to quarantine. To stay up-to-date on COVID-19 Travel Updates, visit www.biophysics.org/2022meeting.

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Cheers for Volunteers

Silvia Cavagnero Committee for Professional Opportunities for Women (CPOW)

Silvia Cavagnero

Is this your first volunteer position for BPS? If not, what other positions have you held? I am currently a member of the Committee for Professional Opportunities for Women (CPOW) and a member of the In- trinsically Disordered Proteins (IDP) Subgroup Council. This is not my first volunteering experience with BPS. In prior years I have served on the Committee for Inclusion and Diversity (CID) and I have been a Chair of the Biopolymers in Vivo (BIV) Subgroup. Why do you volunteer? I really enjoy encouraging and helping other biophysicists, especially if they are underrepresented in science. Everyone who has been trained as a biophysicist deserves to have a chance to acquire more knowledge and understanding of the world around us. By helping others achieve this goal, I feel that I give back to the very community that helped me in so many ways through my career. Volunteering is also an excel- lent way to make new science friends, network, and be part of an amazing worldwide community of biophysicists, many of whom share similar goals and aspirations.

What has been a highlight from your volunteer experience? The major highlights of my current volunteering experience have been co-organizing Networking Events for Biophysicists on behalf of CPOW. I also have been very proud of organizing sessions on Cutting-Edge Topics in Biophysics at the Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Ameri- cans in Sciences (SACNAS) National Conference. Encouraging young students from underrepresented communities at SACNAS has been incredibly fulfilling. Do you have advice for others who might be thinking about volunteering? My best advice is to start by spending some time thinking about what you really care about within BPS. Which activity best resonates with your fondest aspirations? Where can you make a difference? Then volunteer for this activity. It is fun, rewarding, not too time-consuming, and you will immediately make new friends and feel part of an amazing community. When not volunteering for BPS, what do you work on? I really like to think about science and to work with my stu- dents on our research projects. When I don’t, I spend time with my daughters and husband, often outdoors or cooking together, and I cultivate my passion for drawing and painting.

Grants & Opportunities Kavli Prize The Kavli Prize recognizes breakthroughs in astrophysics, nanoscience, and neuroscience—the big, the small, and the complex. Three $1 million prizes are awarded in these fields. Who can apply: Self-nominations are not accepted Deadline: December 1, 2021 Website: https:/ kavliprize.org/events-and-fea- tures/2022-call-nominations

LGBTQ+ Awards from the National Organization of Gay and Lesbian Scientists and Technical Professionals This organization gives a few awards each year with currently open applications. The awards are presented to LGBTQ+ scientists and include Scientist of the Year, Engi- neer of the Year, Educator of the Year, and more. Deadline: December 21, 2021 Website: https:/www.noglstp.org/programs-projects/ recognition-awards/

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Member Corner

Members in the News

B. Montgomery Pettitt , University of Texas Medical Branch and Society member since 1991, was elected as a Fellow of the American Chemical Society.

B. Montgomery Pettitt

Five Society members were named 2021 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Gilliam Fellow Advisers: Catherine Drennan , Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Society member since 2011. Sanjay Kumar , University of California, Berkeley, and Society member since 1999. Karolin Luger , University of Colorado, Boulder, and Society member since 2011. Joseph Puglisi , Stanford University and Society member since 1998. Paul Slesinger , Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Society member since 1988.

Catherine Drennan

Sanjay Kumar

Karolin Luger

Joseph Puglisi

Paul Slesinger

Student Spotlight

Sebastian Kenny Purdue University Department of Chemistry & Molecular Biophysics Training Program What has been the most exciting experience of your studies in biophysics?

The broadness of the areas and topics covered in Biophysics! I only understood the breadth of biophysics when I joined the Das Lab and became a trainee of the Molecular Biophysics Training Program at Purdue. Within this short period, I’ve been able to sit and network with “celebrities” of biophysics of many different research inter- ests. It just comes to show how fundamental knowledge in biophysics can be used to solve so many questions. It is even more exciting when the community is filled with warm and welcoming people!

Sebastian Kenny

Important Dates Call for Futures of Biophysics Deadline Monday, October 18, 2021

Image Contest Submission Opens Tuesday, November 2, 2021

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Career Development

How COVID-19 Has Impactedmy Personal Life It wasn’t that long ago that daily life looked very different. Early in the morning, my wife or I would drop our younger son at the daycare and the older one would go to elementary school. This was followed by both of us rushing to our workplaces. In the labo- ratory, we would work along with fel- low researchers and students, and also attend laboratory meetings. We would

all were online in different rooms to take classes or deliver seminars, and our two-year-old little boy had to entertain himself. I know the situation was similar in all young families. Although there were challenges, COVID-19 brought our family together. We developed an appreciation for each other as well as for friends and colleagues around us. We also learned to appreciate how hard school teachers were working to keep up with young kids. We constantly checked on our neighbors and drew chalk art on the sidewalk to encourage everyone. With my family, we completed 350 miles of bicycle rides and over 150 miles of running during close-downs. There were no laboratory lunches or dinners, but we had virtual happy hours. COVID-19 is not over yet, and cases of the Delta variant are still on the rise. As parents of young boys, we are still appre- hensive as vaccines are not yet recommended for children their age. We have learned how to emphasize positivity and happiness among our family and lab members. A positive and energized environment is a collective exercise because the behaviors and attitudes are reinforced when a group does it together. During COVID-19, we all developed new social and professional scripts in real-time to verbalize the significant impact on happiness and positivity. The opening comments in laboratories have changed from scientific questions like “What happened with your experiments yesterday?” to social well-being: “How are you and your family members?” As researchers, we need to change our approaches from “don’t worry, be happy” to working with our teams to create pat- terns to reinforce positivity. Often it is difficult to invent new ways to be positive, so it is vital to create regular patterns as a department or institute that can help sustain and spread positivity. COVID-19 will be over, hopefully soon, but the ex- perience has taught us that collective happiness and support- ing each other is important for workplace positivity. We have to be patient and compassionate. And I believe in the words of Sri Guru Granth Sahib: “Wind and water have patience and tolerance; the earth has compassion and forgiveness.” — Harpreet Singh , Ohio State University

meet our colleagues in person, go for lunch with other faculty members, and attend seminars in different departments. My laboratory had just moved from Philadelphia to Columbus, and we were focused on setting up our research program once again. It was an exciting time and every member had fresh energy. In the same spirit, our laboratory members attended the 64th Biophysical Society Annual Meeting in San Diego, where we presented our ongoing projects. Not long after that, everything changed. We began to receive messages from friends and colleagues showing symptoms of COVID-19. Within the next few weeks, our institute gave or- ders to shut down laboratories and cease normal operations. We had just re-established our transgenic colonies, which we had to reduce to a bare minimum to avoid losing the colony. All experiments were stopped as our laboratory operations were deemed not essential. During the early days, we focused on writing manuscripts, reviews, and grant applications. To keep the morale high for the laboratory we had meetings on Zoom and kept in touch over the phone. My wife, Shubha Gururaja Rao , was to begin her first tenure-track position, which was an exciting transition, but due to COVID-19, there were challenges for her as well. All our colleagues extended their help to make this transition as smooth as possible, but it created challenges on its own. Our routine changed from dropping kids to school or daycare to taking turns to stay with them at home. All classes and meetings changed to online platforms. The most challenging task was to facilitate online school for our eight-year-old boy. There were times when we

BPS Job Board Fall Recruitment Special Need to fill open faculty/staff roles this fall? BPS is offering a Fall Recruitment Special package to help successfully fill your open roles. Get over $200 in savings! This limited-time package will include: • 60-day Posting on the Career Center where your job will stay high in search results and highlighted to stand out • Job emailed to over 7,500 job seekers in our Jobs Flash Email • 60 days of CV Bank access to actively source candidates • Cost: $549 for members and $749 for non-members Special will end October 31, 2021. Have multiple positions to post? Reach out to Amy Alvarado at amy.alvarado@communitybrands.com to speak about bulk options.

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Career Development

Virtual Graduate Fair – Fall 2021 The first BPS Virtual Graduate Fair will take place November 11–12. This virtual graduate fair will bring together students and recruiters from different schools, each reflecting different programs and opportunities. Students will be able to explore graduate school options, connect with recruiters, and gain an early start on the application process.

Students Register to attend the free virtual graduate fair. All students studying biophysics and related fields who want to get into graduate school can conveniently meet with representatives from colleges, universities, and re- search institutes with leading programs in biophysics. At the event, you will be able to: • Explore the possibilities of graduate and professional education. • Learn about the requirements for programs. • Get detailed information about various schools and their programs. • Network with professionals in your future field. Explore different programs all in one place and gather information to help you select a program that is best for you. This is your opportunity to gain an early start on the application process. Registration is free for all students. Plan to attend and tell your friends!

Graduate School Recruiters Sign up for this new recruiting opportunity! Showcase your program and meet with many prospective students via face-to-face video, audio, or text-based chats, allowing for personal interactions. This is your opportunity to share your biophysics program and those in related fields to prospec- tive program candidates, and to broaden your recruitment reach with more candidates from around the world with the click of a button. Participating in this fair will allow you to: • Save money with no travel costs. • Have multiple departments represented in one “room.” • Easily share highlights and requirements for your programs. • Build a candidate pipeline with a targeted audience. Each graduate program can design a dedicated recruiting page and can include a campus image, logo, videos, and links. The cost to register is $200. The registration deadline is October 20.

For more information and to register, visit https:/www.biophysics.org/virtualgraduatefair.

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